Curious Relics #047: One Big Family


Welcome, if you are a newcomer to this fun bi-weekly segment of AllOutdoor.com! The last time around I covered the history of a German pistol which was a small and quiet commercial success. We had slightly covered the Mauser 1914 and some improvements and adjustments it had throughout the years but not in depth. That being said I am going to include its family of similar guns in the category of variations. Despite the Mauser 1914 not having a whole list of variations, it does have a big family and that is what we are covering today. Let’s dive right into the rabbit hole!


Welcome to our recurring series of “Curious Relics.” Here, we want to share all of our experiences, knowledge, misadventures, and passion for older firearms that one might categorize as a Curio & Relic – any variant that is at least 50 years old according to the ATF. Hopefully along the way you can garner a greater appreciation for older variants like we do, and simultaneously you can teach us things as well through sharing your own expertise and thoughts in the Comments. Understanding the firearms of old, their importance, and their development which lead to many of the arms we now cherish today is incredibly fascinating and we hope you enjoy what we have to share, too!


Variations: The Mauser 1914

Opening Note on Variations

The Mauser Autoloading family of pistols does not necessarily have “variations” and the differences and changes throughout the years are slight. One big thing to keep in mind is that the dimensions, calibers, capacities, etc that I list below were standard for each “variation”. This is back in a time when any average Joe could order one with a longer barrel or in a different finish. That being said you may own, see, or come across one that looks different.

Mauser 1914
Lot 2735: Mauser – 1914. (nd). Rock Island Auction Company. photograph. Retrieved September 6, 2022, from https://www.rockislandauction.com/detail/72/2735/mauser-1914.

Prototype Autoloading Pistol 1907-1909: When the Mauser company started their “family of pistols” endeavor they initially experimented with a 9×19 (9mm parabellum) version but it apparently was not working as intended or it was unable to function safely with that big of a caliber. This 9mm Mauser pistol was scrapped in 1909.

Mauser 1910: Then known as the Mauser 6.35, the Mauser 1910 was being tinkered with simultaneously with the 9mm Prototype but it passed the tests with flying colors. It was chambered in the 25 ACP cartridge, had a 3-inch barrel, a 9-round magazine (heel release), fixed sights, and black rubber or walnut checkered one-piece wraparound grips. It technically was made from 1910 until 1914. The initial Mauser 1910 had a latch on the lefthand side of the receiver which allowed the user to access the internal parts for maintenance. This proved to be overly reliant on the user to be a competent and careful gun owner and was changed in 1914.

Mauser 1914
Lot 3265: Mauser 1910 Pistol 6.35 mm auto. (n.d.). Rock Island Auction Company. photograph. Retrieved August 23, 2022, from https://www.rockislandauction.com/detail/67/3265/mauser-1910-pistol-635-mm-auto.

Mauser 1910/14: This is the more common of the Mauser 1910-specific models. It is the same as the previous 1910 model except for the slide latch now being removed to prevent parts loss or mishandling of the internals. Now in order to get at the side plate, the grip and slide need to be removed. These were made until they were updated in 1934.

Mauser 1914
Lot 197: Mauser Model 1910 Semi-Automatic Pistol. (n.d.). Rock Island Auction Company. photograph. Retrieved September 6, 2022, from https://www.rockislandauction.com/detail/2059/197/ mauser-model-1910-semiautomatic-pistol.

Mauser 1910/34: Skipping ahead a little bit, the Mauser 1910/34 was a last-minute attempt to “modernize” these fairly un-modern handguns. Basically, the only difference is the Model1910/34 has a curved grip rather than a straight one. This gives the feel and appearance of a more ergonomic handgun. Despite the name, the Mauser 1910/34 did not enter production until roughly 1936. After this, it would be produced in small batches until late 1939 or early 1940.

Mauser 1914
Lot 323: Mauser Model 1910/34 Semi-Automatic Pistol with Holster. (n.d.). Rock Island Auction Company. photograph. Retrieved September 6, 2022, from https://www.rockislandauction.com/detail/2024/323/mauser-model-1910-34-semi-automatic-pistol-with-holster.

Mauser 1912 and Mauser 1912/14: A small batch of roughly 200 pistols made in 9mm. After getting the Model 1910 off the ground they went back to trying to make one of these pistols in 9mm. They initially tested it with different styles of blowback until they settled on a “flapper delayed blowback”. Larger in every way but still similar to these pistols never saw large-scale production. There was even a small batch of 45 ACP pistols made for military trials around the world.

Mauser 1914
Lot 1533: Mauser 1912/14 Pistol 9 mm Luger. (n.d.). Rock Island Auction Company. photograph. Retrieved September 6, 2022, from https://www.rockislandauction.com/detail/64/1533/mauser-191214-pistol-9-mm-luger.

Mauser 1914: Our star today was originally referred to as the Mauser 7.65. Made from 1914 until its more modernized take in 1934. Very similar in appearance to the 1910 models but scaled up slightly. It features a 3.4-inch barrel, an 8-round magazine (heel release), fixed sights, and one-piece wraparound plastic or walnut grips. They were different overall and distinguished from the Model 1910 by their chambering. The Mauser 1914 is chambered in 32 ACP.

Mauser 1914

Mauser 1914 Humpback: The earliest versions of the Mauser 1914. Similar in every way to the later one except the swooped down “humpback” couture on the top of the slide.

Mauser 1914
Lot 1493: Early Mauser Model 1914 ‘Humpback’ Semi-Automatic Pistol. (n.d.). Rock Island Auction Company. photograph. Retrieved August 23, 2022, from https://www.rockislandauction.com/detail/69/1493/early-mauser-model-1914-humpback-semiautomatic-pistol.

Mauser 1914/34: This is getting repetitive, I know, but bear with me. You guessed it! The more “modern” take on the 32 ACP 1914 pistol. It has a curved grip rather than a straight one. This gives the feel and appearance of a more ergonomic handgun. Later models got rid of the scooped cut for the slide’s serial number. These began production in early 1934 and ceased in late 1939 or early 1940.

Mauser 1914
Lot 578: Mauser 1934 Pistol 7.65 mm auto. (n.d.). Rock Island Auction Company. photograph. Retrieved August 23, 2022, from https://www.rockislandauction.com/detail/60/578/mauser-1934-pistol-765-mm-auto.

End of Part Two: The Mauser 1914

That is all this time around folks! Typically we go into dating your firearm as well as the variations but there was just too much to cover in the variations alone. Next time I will make sure we cover the dating even though it appears that it will be quite cumbersome. Is there a particular variation you folks like? Maybe you have one of these in your collection. Let us know in the comments below!

Mauser 1914

In closing, I hope our Curious Relics segment informed as well as entertained. This all was written in hopes of continued appreciation and preservation. We did not just realize how guns were supposed to look and function. It was a long and tedious process that has shaped the world we live in. So, I put it to you! Is there a firearm out there that you feel does not get much notoriety? What should our next Curious Relics topic cover? As always, let us know all of your thoughts in the Comments below! We always appreciate your feedback.

Avatar Author ID 286 - 1170332079

Sam.S

Writer | TheFirearmBlog Writer | AllOutdoor.com Instagram | sfsgunsmith Old soul, certified gunsmith, published author, avid firearm history learner, and appreciator of old and unique guns.



Source link

Leave a Comment